Natural weed and fungus killers

After long days of rain, smallholders are faced with two problems: weeds and fungus are rampant.
Try a natural remedy, rather than damaging the soil with toxic chemicals.
To combat weeds, spray or pour white vinegar directly onto the weeds. The acetic acid in the vinegar does two things: it burns the weed’s foliage on contact and it temporarily lowers the pH of the soil, making it hard for the weed to make a comeback.
A teaspoon of dishwashing soap can be added to the vinegar to help it stick to the weeds.
For best results, use on a sunny, dry day.
Vinegar will kill any vegetation that it comes into contact with, so avoid using it around plants that you wish to keep.
Some weeds are persistent, and may need to be treated more than once.
In dealing with different forms of fungus:
• All alliums such as garlic and onions are not only fungicides, but can be used against soft bodied insects.
• Garlic: Chop some cloves finely and soak in 2 teaspoons of oil for one day or in liquid paraffin for two days. Use a glass jar, not a tin. Mix with half a litre of soapy water and filter. Mix 1 part solution with 20 parts of water and use as a spray. Shake well before applying.
• Onion: Crush 500g of onions and add to 5 litres of water and leave for 24 hours, strain and spray. Alternatively, chop some cloves finely and soak in 2 teaspoons of oil for one day. Mix with half a litre of soapy water and filter. Mix 1 part solution with 20 parts water and use it as a spray.
• Syringa: A handful of leaves and berries boiled in 5 litres of water is said to make a general fungicide and insecticide.
• Apple cider vinegar – use a tablespoon per litre of water for a mild fungicide or acidic liquid fertilizer;
• Compost teas – This multi-purpose fluid can contain beneficial microbes and soluble nutrients that can be a mild fungicide and disease controller.